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Nerd Love

25 May

Tardis Wedding Ring

27 Apr

I love it soooo much.
So shiny!
So nerdy!
So full of awesome!

The Final Frontier

26 Apr

Totoro Cupcakes!

24 Apr

I Want To Believe

19 Apr

Has The Star Trek Tricorder Finally Arrived?

16 Apr
*SQUEEEEE*
OMG OMG OMG OMG
I want it.
I want it now.
Live long and prosper, fellow nerds

By Frank SimonsPosted 2012/04/13 at 4:56 pm EDT

LOS ANGELES, Apr. 13, 2012 (Reuters) — Starships, warp speed, transporters, phasers. Think “Star Trek” technology is only the stuff of fiction? Think again.

Dr. Peter Jansen, a PhD graduate of the Cognitive Science Laboratory at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, has developed a scientific measurement device based on the tricorders used by Captain Kirk, Spock, Dr. McCoy and other space adventurers on the classic TV series that has spawned numerous spin-offs in more than 45 years.

“Star Trek inspired me to be a scientist” said Jansen, who has been formally working on his tricorder prototypes since 2007, but toying with the idea of making a functioning device since he was “a kid in high school.” The 29-year-old Jansen’s school days spanned the late 1990s when “Star Trek: Voyager” was on the air. It featured his favorite tricorder, a model with screens on top and bottom. The first tricorder appeared on the original show’s initial episode in 1966, when Capt. Kirk swaggered toward audiences with his phaser weapon holstered to his side but a tricorder in his hand. The hand-held devices for data sensing, analysis and recording, have been a part of “Star Trek” ever since. But if Jansen, a self-confessed “addicted maker” of things, is successful at developing, testing and bringing his instrument into the public, the tricorder may not be just the stuff of “Star Trek” prop rooms. It may be used for real. Jansen said his tricorder can take atmospheric measurements, or ambient temperature, pressure or humidity. It can take electromagnetic measurements to test magnetic fields, and it can make spatial measurements of distance, location, or motion.

 Fascinating, as Spock might say.

Jansen thinks of his tricorder as a “general tool” — a kind of “Swiss Army Knife” — with practical uses in building inspection, for instance, where it might help taking temperature and humidity readings or be a distance sensor to measure rooms. It resembles the device carried by countless “Away Team” members in “Star Trek – The Next Generation” – his favorite of the “Star Trek” shows, he notes.

NO SCIENCE FICTION

No independent group has yet verified his claims for the device which, he said, is one reason for placing his designs on a public website as an “open source” that technology makers can utilize to test and tinker. Jansen has posted schematics and designs of his first and second prototypes, the Mark 1 and Mark 2, for anyone to see and build. Jansen expects to have his latest version, the Mark 4, produced for “about $200.”

Everything you need to build one is online at www.tricorderproject.org, according Jansen. He hopes others will follow his lead.

While it may sound like the stuff of science fiction, Jansen isn’t the only one to take notice of just how useful a real functioning tricorder would be – especially as a medical tool. Telecommunications giant Qualcomm Inc this year launched the “Tricorder X-Prize Contest” with the slogan “Healthcare in the palm of your hand.” Qualcomm hopes to motivate developers with a $10 million prize to make medical tricorders a reality.  Wanda Moebus of the Advanced Medical Technology Association, who is not affiliated with Jansen or Qualcomm, told Reuters the X-Prize “is really cool,” but cautioned that making a real medical tricorder device “would have to be measured on its safety and effect, like all other medical technologies.” Jansen said he has been approached by “a couple of teams” about the X Prize, but added that his prototypes are more for science research than medical tools.

Besides, he said he already is on to his next frontier, making a sort of “replicator,” another “Star Trek” device that will create 3D objects and foods that are dimensional copies of real items. Jansen’s “replicator” is a 3D printer, which in itself is not really new, but the scientist thinks about it in terms reminiscent of “Star Trek’s” famous prologue. It’s “like nothing we’ve ever seen before,” Jansen said.

Microscope Necklace and Earrings

13 Apr


These shiny little delights can be found at Shana Logic.

Vintage Spock

8 Apr

Batman!

30 Mar

Star Trek Amigurumi

30 Mar

*Sigh*
One day my crochet and knitting skills will be good enough to do uber nerdy awesome stuff like this.
But for now I’ll stick to crocheting scarves and jellyfish.
(via Jana Ford Knits)

Oh, House!

28 Mar

❤ ❤ ❤

Happy Birthday, Leonard Nimoy!

26 Mar

 The legendary actor/photographer/writer turns 81 today!
Fun Fact: While Nimoy was playing Mister Spock, his father was a barber who reportedly  had young boys come in and ask for the “Mister Spock haircut,” unaware that he was Mr. Spock’s father.

Nerd Nouveau

20 Mar

Beautiful art nouveau Serenity posters from Quantum Mechanix.



All of then are so beautiful. They also made posters for Reverand Book and Saffron.

And for you Dr. Who Fans (via the Internet, not QM):

St. Patrick’s Day Conversation

18 Mar

Me: “I’m deliberately not wearing green today. That way cute men and women will pinch me. If they’re not cute, then this red shirt I am wearing is actually green, and they are clearly colorblind.”
Phil: “If you happen to see people that look like Kirk, Bones, and Spock, avoid being around them at all costs. You know why. Those guys are awesome too, but clearly not worth the cost given your attire.”
Me: “If Kirk, Bones, or Spock were nearby, my shirt would be quickly removed, regardless of its color.”
Phil: “..well that solves that problem.”

Na Na Na Na Na Na Na Na Batman!!!! (On Dinosaurs)

17 Mar


 Art by Joe Carr (at least the first three. The last one was found on a different site and uncredited). Prints can be found at his Society6 page.

Dalek Propoganda

16 Mar

 

A creation by Francesco Francavilla

R2-KT: The Pink Droid

11 Mar

The following was written by Jamie Frevele of The Mary Sue. I love it because it combines all the elements of a good story: cute kids fighting a tragic cancer, which completely tugs at your heart strings, and Star Wars droids, which completely excites one’s inner nerd. And the color pink, because its a freaking awesome color.

MEET R2-KT: THE PINK DROID INSPIRED BY A LITTLE GIRL WHO FOUGHT CANCER

While this story isn’t what you’d call recent, it was so touching that we couldn’t ignore it. It’s also very sad, so consider yourself warned. But while it’s a sad story about a little girl’s fight with brain cancer, it’s a great story about how a bunch of Star Wars fans (some in very high places) made that little girl happy while she didn’t feel very well. It’s also an origin story, and we love those. Ladies and gentlemen, allow us to introduce you to Katie Johnson and the droid whose creation she inspired: R2-KT.

Back in November 2004, six-year-old Katie was diagnosed with a brain tumor. She immediately underwent chemotherapy treatment and bravely dealt with all the side effects. One day, in April 2005, when she and her family took a picture by their church, Katie noticed something about one of the big windows on the side of the building: it looked like R2-D2. And that gave her father, Albin, an idea — “[W]hy not build an R2 to watch over Katie as she slept (just like R2-D2 watched over Padme in Episode II)?”

So, the elder Johnson, who happens to be the founder of the 501st Legion, the world’s biggest official organization for Stormtrooper cosplayers that does charity work around the globe, got in touch with the R2 Builders Club to see about building Katie her very own droid. Albin and his older daughter, Allie, aimed to make it pink and name it after Katie (hence R2-KT).

However, the reality was that Katie wasn’t doing very well and time was running out. But the builders rallied and got R2-KT built and delivered a preliminary — but life-sized — model to the little girl’s house.

Sadly, Katie passed away in her sleep the following August. But she got to hang out with her faithful droid for a little while before having to leave it behind. R2-KT was officially completed on July 8, 2006, just over a year after the start date. Now, R2-KT visits conventions, children’s hospitals, and charity events all over the place.

To find out more about R2-KT’s ongoing adventures (and their current St. Patrick’s Day promotion), visit their official site.

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A.Theria’s Note: Definitely go visit the site. They have knit R2-KTs. Seriously, how can you not love that?

Optimus Prime Narrates Nasa Ad

10 Mar

Oh, the nostalgia!

Lego Space Station

10 Mar

I actually meant to post this last week, but got distracted, and am currently playing catch-up with all the articles and science/awesome-related content I’ve been meaning to post.


Japanese astronaut Satoshi Furukawa built a Lego model of the International Space Station while aboard the International Space Station. CollectSPACE.com reports that the model was “part of an educational collaboration between the Danish toy company and NASA.” You can watch a brief time lapse video of the model coming together and read more about it over on CollectSPACE.com.



I love this story for so many reasons. I love Legos. I love space. I love the concept of Legos in space, so you never have to accidentally step on a Lego again. I love goddamn super awesome astronauts. Mr. Furukawa, please have my babies.